Dominus Historiae: Part II

Continuing my review of Jean Daniélou’s The Lord of History from here.

In these eight chapters, Daniélou transitions to exegesis, building on the foundation laid especially by the last chapter. The examination of sacred and secular modes of history served to define the space proper to the former; now, Daniélou returns ad fontes to fill that space. What does sacred history actually look like, according to scriptural Christian theology?

Chapters 1-3 thus examine divine action, human action, and the synergism implied in the incarnation respectively. Chapters 4-6 involve typology and progress, or the relationships between historical stages, and chapters 7-8 address eschatology.

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The Sorrow-Filled Mother Stood

Another translation from Latin. Usually attributed to Fra Jacopone da Todi in the 13th century. If you have not heard Pergolesi’s setting of this poem, look it up immediately.

Stabat Mater Dolorosa

The sorrow-filled mother stood weeping near the cross,
while hung her son.

Through her spirit, moaning, saddened, and in pain,
passed a sword.

How sad and crushed down was that blessed one,
mother of the alone-begotten!

Mournful and hurting, that good mother, while she watched
the punishment of her glorious son.

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A Conversation on Lent and Church Observances

This “Lenten” exchange has been taking place on Facebook, and as my responses were getting longer and longer, I decided to leave my latest response here. I have included the preceding conversation below. To my friends in the Facebook debate, I’m not trying to force the whole debate to move to this site, so please continue the discussion on Facebook if you prefer. (I’ve used initials as a courtesy to anyone who might prefer anonymity outside Facebook.)

Click here to jump to my response.

C.

“And when you fast, do not look gloomy like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces that their fasting may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, that your fasting may not be seen by others but by your Father who is in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you.” -Jesus, explaining how to fast, and thus contradicting the observance of Lent.

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