Ancient-Future Faith: A Review

PALEO-ORTHODOXY. This term, at its broadest, refers to a general movement among evangelicals, especially young conservative evangelicals, toward recovery of early-church teaching and practice. For some, this means conversion to Catholicism or Eastern Orthodoxy, or the less dramatic move to Anglicanism. But for many, this simply means a desire to structure one’s religious life to be more in accord with the Fathers of the Church and classical Christian teaching. The self-consciously Paleo-Orthodox movement, associated especially with Methodist theologian Thomas Oden, seeks to reincorporate the richness of the Christian tradition while remaining firmly Evangelical. Though it is only one among many diverse movements within postmodern Evangelicalism, Paleo-Orthodoxy’s proponents believe it may point the way to the future of Evangelicalism.

I could not fix a definite denominational label to myself, but “Paleo-Orthodox” makes a passable filler term, indicating as it does a serious interest in Classical Christianity. That said, I have never hitherto read something from a consciously Paleo-Orthodox author. I have usually gone directly to the Church Fathers, or sometimes to members of those traditions which hold them most dear (Catholics and Orthodox). What I have read directly or mediately has been concerned with the Fathers as such, or the continuing theological tradition. However, Paleo-Orthodoxy as a movement is about more than looking back; it is about finding a way for classical Christianity to influence who we are today, as evangelicals.

Ancient-Future Faith: Rethinking Evangelicalism for a Postmodern World purports to be a kind of Paleo-Orthodox primer. The late author Robert Webber, a Wheaton professor of theology, was one of the more outstanding figures in the Paleo-Orthodox movement. He was born Baptist and studied in Anglican, Presbyterian, and Lutheran seminaries, eventually settling in the Episcopal Church but working across denominations. Webber was particularly interested in worship ancient and modern, and today has the ecumenical Institute for Worship Studies in Florida, of which he was first president, named after him. He died in 2007 of pancreatic cancer. Ancient-Future Faith, published in 1999, is one of four books in the “Ancient-Future” series.

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A Conversation on Lent and Church Observances

This “Lenten” exchange has been taking place on Facebook, and as my responses were getting longer and longer, I decided to leave my latest response here. I have included the preceding conversation below. To my friends in the Facebook debate, I’m not trying to force the whole debate to move to this site, so please continue the discussion on Facebook if you prefer. (I’ve used initials as a courtesy to anyone who might prefer anonymity outside Facebook.)

Click here to jump to my response.

C.

“And when you fast, do not look gloomy like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces that their fasting may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, that your fasting may not be seen by others but by your Father who is in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you.” -Jesus, explaining how to fast, and thus contradicting the observance of Lent.

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